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CS3: The Slavonic Languages

This paper is available for the academic year 2016-17 at Part II only for undergraduate students. There is no restriction on graduate students. 

The goal of this paper is twofold: first, to achieve a thorough understanding of the oldest Slavonic literary language (Old Church Slavonic); and second, to understand the major developments (primarily related to the sound structure) that led to the dissolution of Common Slavonic and the creation of the contemporary Slavonic languages.

The first half of the lectures for this paper are dedicated to analysing the sound and grammatical structure—the phonology and morphology—of Old Church Slavonic and reading texts written in this language. The second half of the lectures are dedicated to tracing the development of the Slavonic languages from Common Slavonic, paying particular attention to the development of the sound systems of the various Slavonic languages.

Objectives

By the end of this paper you should be able to:

  1. read texts in Old Church Slavonic;
  2. discuss the significance of a wide variety of forms found in Old Church Slavonic in terms of the historical development of the Slavonic languages;
  3. compare and contrast a number of Slavonic languages in terms of their phonetic, phonological, and morphological structure;
  4. discuss the most significant phonological and morphological developments in a number of Slavonic languages;
  5. analyse sets of related words in a number of Slavonic languages from a historical perspective
Topics: 

Historical sound changes (phonology)

  • Townsend, C. and L. Janda (1996): Common and Comparative Slavic: Phonology and Inflection with Special Attention to Russian, Polish, Czech, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica.
  • Schenker, A. M. (1995): The Dawn of Slavic: An Introduction to Slavic Philology. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press
  • Carlton, T. R. 1990. Introduction to the Phonological History of the Slavic Languages. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica.

Formation of the Slavonic Standard languages

  • Hill, P. M. (1999): The Codification and Elaboration of the Slavonic Standard Languages, in: Australian Slavonic and East European Studies 13/2, 21-31.
  • Schenker, A. and E. Stankiewicz. 1980. The Slavic Literary Languages: Formation and Development. New Haven: Yale Russian and East European Publications.
  • Stone, G. and D. Worth. 1985. The Formation of the Slavonic Literary Languages. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica.
Preparatory reading: 

Historical sound changes (phonology)

  • Townsend, C. and L. Janda (1996): Common and Comparative Slavic: Phonology and Inflection with Special Attention to Russian, Polish, Czech, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica.
  • Carlton, T. R. 1990. Introduction to the Phonological History of the Slavic Languages. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica.
  • Schenker, A. M. 1995. The Dawn of Slavic: An Introduction to Slavic Philology. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press.

The Slavonic Languages

  • Comrie B. and G. Corbett. 1993. The Slavonic Languages. London: Routledge.
  • Cubberley, P. and R. Sussex. The Slavic Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Linguistics

  • Campbell, L. (1998): Historical Linguistics: An Introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Radford, A, and M. Atkinson, et. al. 2009. Linguistics: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Full reading list

Please see the reading list for CS3.

Teaching and learning: 

Lectures and supervisions form an integrated package which will give you a thorough grounding in the subject and prepare you for the examination. This means that you cannot make a success of this course by concentrating just on supervisions: regular attendance at lectures is vital.

This paper assumes a reasonably high level of proficiency in at least one Slavonic language, e.g. the equivalent of at least two years of Russian in the Department of Slavonic Studies. Sufficient background knowledge of a Slavonic language is essential for the Old Church Slavonic component of the paper.

Assessment: 

This paper is for part II students only. The exam for this paper is divided into two sections, containing in total roughly twelve questions. All candidates must answer three questions: one question from Section A (linguistic textual analysis) and two questions from Section B.

Course Contacts: 
Dr Kylie Richardson