Staff Profiles

University Teaching Officers

College Teaching Officers

University Language Teaching Officers

Other Teaching Officers and Lectors

Research Fellows

Departmental Secretary


University Teaching Officers


Dr Joachim Whaley

Head of Department
University Senior Lecturer

Gonville and Caius College
Tel. 332454
e-mail: jw10005@hermes.cam.ac.uk

Joachim Whaley teaches and researches in German history and culture since 1500. He is the author of Religious Toleration and Social Change in Hamburg, 1529-1819 (Cambridge, 1985) in addition to numerous articles, reviews and contributions to handbooks and lexicons of German history and literature. He is currently writing a history of the Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806. Like all members of the Department he also teaches German language, and he has a special interest in translation. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a Member of the Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education.


Professor Nicholas Boyle

Professor of German Literary and Intellectual History

Magdalene College
Tel. 332137
e-mail: nb215@cam.ac.uk

Nicholas Boyle has been Professor of German Literary and Intellectual History since 2000, and has taught German in Cambridge since he was a student. He has a particular interest in German literature and thought of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and especially in Goethe, and in the relation between religion and literature. He has so far published two volumes of his prizewinning biography, Goethe: the Poet and the Age and is currently working on the third and (he hopes) last. The biography has been translated into German and in 2000 Prof Boyle was awarded the Goethe Medal of the Goethe-Institut. In 2001 he was elected to the British Academy. His wide interests in European literature, philosophy, theology, and politics are reflected in his book of essays, Who Are We Now?, published in 1998, and in his most recent book Sacred and Secular Scriptures: A Catholic Approach to Literature, to be published in 2004. He has also edited various volumes and a CD-ROM of Goethe's works, and has published a study of Faust Part One and numerous articles on French and German literature. Profesor Boyle is a Fellow of Magdalene College. He is married to a lawyer and has four children.


Dr Mark G Chinca

University Senior Lecturer

Trinity College
Tel. 338542
e-mail: mgc1000@cam.ac.uk

Mark Chinca works on medieval literature, with an emphasis on literary theory and historical anthropology. He is the author and editor of several books and essay collections, including History, fiction, verisimilitude (London 1993), Gottfried von Strassburg: Tristan (Cambridge 1997), Blütezeit (Tübingen 2000); he has also published numerous essays and articles on a wide range of genres and topics, and reviews regularly for both British and German journals. Current research is focused on death writing in the later middle ages, and the associated issues of memory, exemplarity and discursivity.

Dr Peter Hutchinson

Deputy Head of Department
Reader in Modern German Studies

Trinity Hall
Tel. 332452
e-mail: ph10000@cam.ac.uk

Peter Hutchinson teaches German literature from 1700 to the present day and has a particular interest in literature since 1945, especially in living writers. One of his specialist subjects is the history of the former East Germany, the 'German Democratic Republic', and many of his publications have been devoted to aspects of the literature of dissent in that society. He has a strong interest in methods of teaching, both language and literature, and he has edited a number of modern texts which have regularly been used at A level and in first-year university courses. For many years he has been the literary editor of the teachers' journal Deutsch: Lehren und Lernen, and he is Editor of the Bristol Classical Texts German Series.


Dr David R Midgley

Reader

St John's College
Tel. 338779
e-mail: drm7@joh.cam.ac.uk

David Midgley has written extensively on German literature and thought of the period since the unification of 1871, with a particular focus on literary modernism (Wedekind, Horváth, Brecht, Döblin, and Musil). He has contributed especially to the interpretation of the writings of Arnold Zweig, and his most recent book is a comprehensive study of the literature of the Weimar Republic entitled Writing Weimar (OUP 2000). He is currently working on cultural change in 20th-century Germany and its reflections in literature, and leads the research group 'Cultural History and Literary Imagination'.

Dr Michael R Minden

University Senior Lecturer

Jesus College
Tel. 339437
e-mail: mrm1001@cam.ac.uk

Michael Minden's publications cover a wide range of topics, concentrating on German literary culture since 1750, with some work on early German film. His major publications of the last few years are The German Bildungsroman: Incest and Inheritance (Cambridge, 1997) and edited volumes on Thomas Mann (London, 1995) and Fritz Lang's Metropolis (Rochester, 2000). He is currently working on a cultural history of German literature.

Professor H Barry Nisbet

Professor of Modern Languages (German)

Sidney Sussex College
Tel. 338877
e-mail: hbn1000cam.ac.uk

Barry Nisbet has been Professor of Modern Languages (German) at the University of Cambridge since 1982. He was previously Reader in German at the University of Bristol and Professor of German at the University of St Andrews. His speciality is the literature and thought of eighteenth-century Germany, and its relation to the European Enlightenment. He has written books on Herder and Goethe, edited six other books and published some fifty articles and over a hundred reviews on related topics. At different times, he has served as General Editor and Germanic Editor of Modern Language Review, and he is joint General Editor, with Claude Rawson of Yale University, of the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism, seven of whose projected nine volumes have so far appeared. He has also translated four volumes of works by Kant and Hegel for Cambridge University Press. In 1998, he was awarded a Humboldt Prize for research on Lessing, of whom he is currently writing a critical biography.

Professor Roger C Paulin

Schröder Professor

Trinity College
Tel. 338574
e-mail: rcp1000@cam.ac.uk

Roger Paulin has been Schröder Professor since 1989. He previously taught at Bristol and Cambridge and held a chair at Manchester. His major interest is literary history from 1700-1900. His chief monograph publications have been on Ludwig Tieck (1985), on the German Novelle (1985), and on the reception of Shakespeare in Germany (2003). He has published numerous articles on Goethe, Kleist, Romanticism, and on German poetry from Klopstock to Rilke. In 2002 he was awarded a Humboldt Prize.

Dr Mary E Stewart

University Senior Lecturer

Robinson College
Tel. 339155
e-mail: mes1000@cam.ac.uk

Mary Stewart has taught in the universities of both Munich and London (KCL) as well as Cambridge. Her principal research interests are twofold: German Naturalism, with regard to both drama and narrative writing, and post-1945 narrative writing, particularly modern Swiss authors and Uwe Johnson. Recent publications include articles on Margrit Schriber and Gerhart Hauptmann for both English and German volumes. She is currently working on a monograph on Uwe Johnson and also looking at the short prose of Naturalism.

Dr Sheila Watts

University Lecturer

Newnham College
Tel. 335816
e-mail: sw271@cam.ac.uk

Sheila Watts is a graduate of Dublin University who moved to Cambridge in 1998 to take up a post teaching German and Germanic linguistics. The main focus of her research to date has been on the expression of time within the verb phrase through categories like tense, aspect and Aktionsart, and she has written on verbal prefixes, on the development of the perfect, and on other phenomena linked to grammaticalization in the older Germanic languages. Another interest concerns ideas about the German language in the 17th century, and she has recently published on both the grammarian Justus Georg Schottelius and the lexicographer Caspar Stieler. Lastly, she is committed to all aspects of language teaching, and has published on ab initio learners as well as on the teaching of spoken German at third level.

Dr Andrew J Webber

University Senior Lecturer

Churchill College
Tel. 338344
e-mail: ajw12@hermes.cam.ac.uk

Andrew Webber teaches and researches in nineteenth- and twentieth-century German and Austrian culture, with special interests in narrative writing and film. Much of his published work, including his book The Doppelgänger: Double Visions in German Literature (Oxford, 1996), is concerned with issues of subjectivity. He has an active interest in psychoanalysis and in theories of gender and sexuality. He teaches on the Faculty's two modern comparative papers and is currently writing a cultural history of the European Avant-Garde with reference to a wide range of media and to several language areas in addition to German. He also teaches translation and has most recently completed a translation of the Schreber Case for the new Penguin edition of the works of Freud. He was until recently Director of the MPhil in European Literature and remains actively involved in the teaching and organisation of the course.

Dr Christopher J Young

University Lecturer

Pembroke College
Tel. 338144
e-mail: cjy1000@hermes.cam.ac.uk

Christopher Young has a primary teaching and research focus on medieval German literature and subsidiary interests in the history of the German language and the sociology of sport. He is the author of Narrativische Perspektiven in Wolframs Willehalm and co-editor of Blütezeit (both Tübingen 2000), has addressed major conferences in the field in Europe, and organised an international conference on thirteenth-century literacy (Cambridge 2001). In 2000-1 he was awarded a fellowship by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung and spent a year researching at the University of Cologne. His work there - an edition, translation and commentary of Ulrich von Liechtenstein's Frauenbuch - will be published by Reclam. He is currently completing a co-authored History of the German Language through Texts (Routledge), preparing a special edition of American Behavioural Scientist (with Andrei Markovits) on 'Sports and Cultural Space' and beginning a new project on German national identity at the Munich Olympics 1972. With other members of the faculty, he has recently completed work on German Video Plus (an interactive CD ROM) for Arnold, and is currently engaged on a co-authored German grammar for CUP.

College Teaching Officers


Dr Anita M Bunyan

College Teaching Officer

Gonville and Caius College
Tel. 332427
e-mail: amb37@cam.ac.uk

Anita Bunyan teaches and researches in nineteenth and twentieth-century German literature and history. She is particularly interested in German-Jewish culture, has published on nineteenth century German-Jewish authors and history, and is working on a study of Modern German-Jewish writing. She has also published on the relationship between literature and history.

Dr John D Guthrie

College Teaching Officer

New Hall
Tel. 762268
e-mail: jdg1003@cam.ac.uk

John Guthrie studied at the University of Western Australia, Tübingen and Cambridge (Corpus Christi College) and has taught at the Universities of Leicester, Leeds, and since 1984 at Cambridge, where he is Fellow in German and Director of Studies in Modern Languages at New Hall, and Newton Trust Lecturer in the Department of German. He teaches German literature and thought from 1720, with the main emphasis being on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and has research interests in drama (its language, performance, and production), poetry and poetics. He has written books on Lenz and Büchner and Droste-Hülshoff, and edited Büchner's Woyzeck. He has recently edited with Nicholas Boyle a volume of essays, Goethe and the English-Speaking World (Camden House, 2001). He is currently working on a project on the language of German drama in the period 1750-1815.

Dr Erika M Swales

College Teaching Officer

King's College
Tel. 331428
e-mail: ems32@cam.ac.uk

Erika Swales, a graduate of the universities of Washington and Basel, has written extensively on German drama and prose fiction of the 18th and 19th century (a Critical Guide to Schiller's Maria Stuart; a study, in collaboration with Martin Swales, of Adalbert Stifter; a monograph on Gottfried Keller). Her most recent book, written in collaboration with Martin Swales, is Reading Goethe, 2001.

Dr Charlotte Woodford

College Teaching Officer

Selwyn College
Tel. 335858
e-mail: cw268@cam.ac.uk

Charlotte Woodford teaches German literature and history after 1500, in particular in the nineteenth century and the early modern period (1500-1700). Her research focuses in particular on women's writing. Her first book, Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany, was published in 2002. She is currently working on the novels of the Austrian author, Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach (d. 1916).

University Language Teaching Officers


Mrs Annemarie Künzl-Snodgrass

Senior Language Teaching Officer

Jesus College
Tel. 335017
e-mail: amk27@cam.ac.uk

Annemarie Künzl-Snodgrass came to England in 1981 and was Lektorin for German Language and Literature at King's College London before moving to Cambridge. She is now a Language Teaching Officer at the Department of German and Lektorin at Jesus College. Apart from teaching the German language at all levels, her work also involves lectures on Landeskunde and linguistic topics. Her special interests are the teaching of ab initio German and of advanced translation, and the development of teaching materials for computer-assisted language learning (CALL), on which she is currently working. She is co-author of an interactive CD-ROM, Video Plus German (Arnold 2003). Together with a colleague she has published a revision guide to German grammar, Upgrade your German (Arnold 2003). She has co-translated from the German, with Anthony Snodgrass, a short book by Tonio Hölscher, The Language of Images in Roman Art (Cambridge University Press 2003).

Ms Silke C Mentchen

Language Teaching Officer

Magdalene College
Tel. 335017
e-mail: scm30@cam.ac.uk

Silke Mentchen, a graduate of Cologne University, has been teaching German as a foreign language for seven years at all levels in tertiary education. She has been teaching at the Department of German since 1997. Previously, she was the German Lector at Anglia Polytechnic University. In addition, she has taught at Fachhochschule Münster (English as a Foreign Language) and is German Lector for Trinity Hall and for Magdalene College where she is also Director of Studies in German. In these capacities she teaches and examines at all levels, with a special interest in advanced translation and beginners' language courses. Special interests include 'youth language', and modern and contemporary German literature. She is currently working on a Grammar exercise book for post-A-level students.

Other Teaching Officers and Lectors


Dr Stephen R Fennell

Lecturer Affiliated to the Department of German


Tel. 763059
e-mail: srf22cam.ac.uk

Stephen Fennell has lectured in the Department of German since 1994. Previously he was a lecturer at the University of Sydney. His specialist expertise is in the areas of philosophy, poetry and poetics, Germanic philology, and the German life and letters of the Eighteenth Century, and he has written and lectured internationally on Hölderlin, Goethe, Jean Paul Richter (monograph Gleich und Gleich, Würzburg 1996), Max Müller, and Germany and the Colonial world. His bidirectional Gothic-English dictionary is now being prepared for publication, and his current work is on the life and works of Friedrich Hölderlin.

Dr des. Ute Wölfel

DAAD Lektorin

Sidney Sussex College
Tel. 38865
e-mail: uw204cam.ac.uk

Ute Wölfel studied at the Humboldt University, Berlin. She teaches and researches in early nineteenth and in twentieth-century literature. Her major interests are literature of the GDR and modern German women writers as well as gender and narrative theory. She has published on German post-war literature and has recently co-edited a volume of essays, Krieg und Nachkrieg. Konfigurationen deutschsprachiger Literatur (1940-1965) (Erich Schmitt, 2004). A second volume on GDR Literature is forthcoming (Königshausen & Neumann).

Research Fellows


Dr Bettina Bildhauer

Research Fellow

Emmanuel College
e-mail: bb221@cam.ac.uk

Bettina Bildhauer studied at Cologne and Cambridge. Her research and teaching focuses on medieval German literature and culture, with a particular emphasis on bodies and gender. She has co-edited The Monstrous Middle Ages, (Cardiff 2003), and her book Medieval Blood is forthcoming. She is currently working on representations of the Middle Ages in post-war German film.

Dr Lucia Ruprecht

Research Fellow

Churchill College
e-mail: lr222@cam.ac.uk

Lucia Ruprecht graduated from the Universities of Tübingen and Aix-en-Provence and completed her PhD at Cambridge. She researches and teaches in nineteenth and early twentieth-century German literature and culture. Her work to date has focused on questions of intermediality between literature and the history and theory of dance. She has a strong interest in literary and cultural theory and is co-editor of Performance and Performativity in German Cultural Studies, (Oxford, 2003). She is currently working on the notion of charisma in early twentieth-century cultural theory, literature, film and dance.

Secretary


Ms Sharon Nevill

Departmental Secretary


Tel. 335037
e-mail: sdn20@cam.ac.uk

The Department of German Office is in Room 201 in the Raised Faculty Building, Sidgwick Avenue
Office opening hours are:
9:15 - 13:00 and 14:00 - 17:15 Monday to Thursday
9:15 - 13:00 and 14:00 - 16:15 Friday

 

 

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