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Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages

 

Dr Sheila Watts

Dr Sheila Watts
Position(s): 
University Lecturer
Department/Section: 
German & Dutch
Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages
Contact details: 
Telephone number: 
+44 (0)1223 335 816
College: 
Location: 

Newnham College
Sidgwick Avenue
Cambridge
CB3 9DF
United Kingdom

 

 

About: 

Sheila Watts has been a lecturer in German at Cambridge and a Fellow of Newnham College since 1998.

Teaching interests: 

Sheila Watts teaches German and Germanic linguistics across all years of the MML Tripos. She co-ordinates the papers Ge7, ‘German: A Linguistic Introduction’, and Ge11 ‘History of German’ as well as contributing lectures on dictionaries and their role in defining German for the introductory Ge1 paper. In a collaboration with colleagues in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, Sheila Watts offers teaching on the older Germanic languages to students across the School. She supervises MPhil and PhD students in any area of German and Germanic linguistics.

Research interests: 

Sheila Watts specializes in the historical linguistics of German and related languages. She has published on verb categories and on gender in Old Saxon and Old High German. A further interest is in the history of linguistic ideas about German, where she has published on  the grammarian Justus Georg Schottelius and the lexicographer Caspar Stieler.

Recent research projects: 

Since 2011 Sheila has been part of a project group with Anne Breitbarth (Ghent) and George Walkden (Manchester, now Konstanz) working to build a digital Corpus of Historical Low German (CHLG). This project has been supported by the Newton Trust, the British Academy and the Government of Flanders. From October 2017 a new project, funded by the Norwegian Research Foundation,  will explore the Early Germanic Noun Phrase, where Sheila will work with colleagues from Oslo, Manchester, Wuppertal and Konstanz.

With David Willis (Theoretical and Applied Linguistics), Sheila is running a series of workshops on historical morphosyntax and Germanic corpora, supported by the DAAD Cambridge Research Hub for German Studies.