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Department of Italian

Welcome to the Department of Italian.

Please click on the links or use the menu options given on the left. On this site, you will find extensive information about the Department of Italian and the undergraduate and graduate courses which we offer.

You will also find information about the wealth of resources and online resources which are available to the department, as well as about our staff and their research interests which cover a wide range of specialisms. There are also sections detailing news, events the student Italian Society and other topics of interest. There is a link to the extensive Italian Collections at the University Library here.

The Department of Italian is happy to answer any questions that current or prospective staff and students may have. You will find contact details here.

Why Study Italian? Click and scroll down here for a short film about studying Italian at University.

 

Graduate Study: Prospective Masters (M Phil) and doctoral (PhD) students are welcome to contact the department's Graduate Coordinator, Professor Robert Gordon (rscg1@cam.ac.uk)

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Latest News

Cambridge Italian Dialect Syntax-Morphology Meeting

3 July 2017

We are happy to announce that the 12th Cambridge Italian Dialect Syntax-Morphology Meeting (CIDSM) will take place in the Department of Italian of the University of Cambridge on Monday 3rd July - Wednesday 5th July 2017

Cambridge Workshop on Voice

22 May 2017

The Cambridge Workshop on Voice will take place on May 22-24 in Cambridge, UK. It will be hosted by the Italian Department, University of Cambridge, and funded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie project Aromanian Syntax (AROSYN), awarded to Dr. Marios Mavrogiorgos (researcher) in collaboration with Professor Adam Ledgeway (PI). The theme of the workshop is voice and voice-related phenomena, and how these inform current theoretical, typological and/or experimental work.

Antony and Cleopatra and Cavafy

28 February 2017

Upcoming Greek Event This presentation examines C. P. Cavafy's interest in Shakespeare (which perhaps dates from Cavafy's early teenage years in England) and focusses on the Alexandrian Greek poet's adaptations, in several poems, of elements of Shakespeare's Alexandrian play, Antony and Cleopatra.