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Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages

 

Professor Simon Franklin

Position(s): 
Professor of Slavonic Studies
Department/Section: 
Slavonic Studies
Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages
Contact details: 
Telephone number: 
+44 (0)1223 333 263
College: 
Location: 

Clare College
University of Cambridge
Trinity Lane
Cambridge
CB2 1TL
United Kingdom

About: 

Fellow of the British Academy

Winner of the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Winner of the Alex Nove Prize

Research interests: 

Most of my research has been concerned with the history and culture of early Rus and of Russia in the Early Modern period, though I have also published occasional studies of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature. In particular, I have focussed on aspects of the cultural significances of the written word across a broad spectrum of genres and forms and technologies: handwritten and printed, graffiti, inscribed objects, ephemera. Most recently I have been developing holistic approach to the study of the ‘graphosphere’, the space of visible words.

Published works: 

Principal publications

Books:

  • The Russian Graphosphere, 1450-1850 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2019)
  • (ed., with Katherine Bowers) Information and Empire: Mechanisms of Communication in Russia, 1600-1850 (Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2017); free downloads at https://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/636%5d
  • (ed., with Emma Widdis) National Identity in Russian Culture. An Introduction (Cambridge University Press, 2004)
  • Byzantium – Rus – Russia: Studies in the Translation of Christian Culture (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002)
  • Writing, Society and Culture in Early Rus, 950-1300 (Cambridge University Press, 2002)
  • (with Jonathan Shepard) The Emergence of Rus, 750-1200 (London: Longman, 1996)
  • Sermons and Rhetoric of Kievan Rus’ (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1991)

Selected Articles (since 2010)

  • ‘Information in  Plain Sight: the Formation of the Public Graphosphere’. In Franklin and Bowers, Information and Empire, 341-367
  • ‘Three Types of Asymmetry in the Muscovite Engagement with Print’, Canadian-American Slavic Studies 51.2-3 (2017), 351-375
  • ‘K voprosu o malykh zhanrakh kirillicheskoi pechati’, in: 450 let Apostolu Ivana Fedorova. Istoriia rannego knigopechataniia v Rossii, ed. D. N. Ramazanova (Moscow: Pashkov dom, 2016), 228-239
  • ‘A Polyphony of Rules and Categories: the Case of Early Rus’, in Legalism: Rules and Categories, ed. Paul Dresch and Judith Scheele (Oxford University Press, 2015), 177-203
  • ‘Printing and Social Control in Russia, 3: Blank Forms’, Russian History 42.1 (2015), 114-135
  • ‘Tekhnologiia vlasti v XVIII veke: o zarozhdenii i tipologii “svetskikh” pechatnykh blankov’, Trudy Gosudarstvennogo Ermitazha LXXI (St Petersburg, 2014), 372-383
  • ‘Printing and Social Control in Russia, 2: Decrees’, Russian History 38.4 (2011), 467-492
  • ‘Mapping the Graphosphere: Cultures of Writing in Early 19th-Century Russia (and Before)’, Kritika 12.1 (2011), 531-560
  • ‘Printing and Social Control in Russia, 1: Passports’, Russian History 37.3 (2010), 208-237
  • ‘Printing Moscow: Significances of the Frontispiece to the 1663 Bible’, Slavonic and East European Review 88 (2010), 73-95